Top 10 Best Palatino Violin 2022 Pick By Experts

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If you are looking for best Palatino Violin you go to right place. Here we ranked and reviewed the top 10 Best Palatino Violin that are highly rated by customers from many Brand with price sorted from low to high.

10 Best Palatino Violin 2022 short list

Top 10 Best Palatino Violin for 2022 Price and Features Comparison

Cecilio CVN-300 Solidwood Ebony Fitted Violin with D'Addario Prelude Strings, Size 4/4 (Full Size)

★★★★★
$149.99  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 5 pounds
Product Dimensions 32 x 12 x 5 inches
ASIN B00EOYKGH0
Item model number DA_4/4CVN-300+SR+92D+FB1
Batteries 2 AAA batteries required. (included)
Best Sellers Rank #1,234 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #4 in Acoustic Violins
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available August 19, 2013
Back Material Maple
Color Name Varnish
Top Material Spruce
Number of Strings 4
Size 4/4
Battery type Zinc Carbon

  • Great Violin For Beginners: The beginner violin is an ideal stringed musical instrument for any student who has dreams of playing music. The set includes all the necessities to start learning how to play.
  • Elegant Design: As beautiful as most stringed musical instruments, these...

Mendini by Cecilio Violin Instrument – MV400 Size 4/4 Acoustic Violin with Bow, Case, Tuner, Metronome & Extra Strings, Kids & Beginner Violin, Maple Varnish, Full Size Violin

★★★★★
$119.99  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 4.59 pounds
Product Dimensions 32 x 12 x 5 inches
ASIN B01N9EA2ES
Item model number 4/4MV400+SR+92D+FB1
Batteries 2 AAA batteries required. (included)
Best Sellers Rank #4,639 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #11 in Acoustic Violins
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available December 5, 2016
Back Material Maple, Wood, Ebony, Spruce Wood
Color Name Varnish
Top Material Maple, Spruce, Ebony
Number of Strings 4
Size Size 4/4 (full size)
Battery type Zinc Carbon

  • A great violin for beginners, these hand-carved, solid wood, half-size violins are charming starter stringed musical instruments for students of any age.
  • Our Mendini violin kit also includes a lightweight, hard carry case with backpack and shoulder straps, two Brazil wood bows,...

Palatino Anziano Violin Outfit 4/4, VN-950

$399.99  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

ASIN B002IBOUXW
Date First Available July 21, 2009
Back Material Rosewood, Ebony
Color Name Sand,Brown
Top Material Rosewood, Ebony
Number of Strings 4

Based on a classic Ferdinando Garimberti model, the new Anziano violin is a hand-crafted marvel with a full-bodied tone and an understated beauty. The violin features an exceptionally lightweight body by following Garimberti's original designs, and is made from select tonewoods for the best...

Palatino VN-950 Anziano Violin Outfit, 4/4 Size

★★★★★
$399.99  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 4 pounds
Product Dimensions 32.9 x 10.5 x 5.5 inches
ASIN B000FJ10SM
Item model number VN-950
Best Sellers Rank #255,530 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #1,079 in Acoustic Violins
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available April 28, 2006
Back Material Flamed Maple
Body Material Flamed Maple
Color Name brown
String Gauge Custom
String Material Alloy Steel
Top Material Spruce
Neck Material Type Flamed Maple
Number of Strings 4

  • Tightly Grained Select Spruce Top
  • Highly Flamed Maple Back & Sides
  • Hand Carved Flamed Maple Neck & Scroll
  • Grade-A Ebony Fittings
  • Octagonal Brazilwood Bow & Slide

Palatino VN-350-3/4 Campus Violin Outfit, 3/4 Size

★★★★★
$309.99
$179.97
 in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 3.6 pounds
Product Dimensions 31 x 10 x 6 inches
ASIN B000BD01R8
Item model number VN-350-3/4
Best Sellers Rank #114,383 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #324 in Acoustic Violins
Date First Available September 10, 2005
Back Material Maple, Spruce Wood
Color Name Natural
String Material Alloy Steel
Top Material Spruce
Number of Strings 4
Size 3/4

  • Spruce Top
  • Maple Back, Sides & Neck
  • Fine Tuner Tailpiece
  • Ebonized Frog Bow
  • Featherweight Case

Cecilio 4/4 CVNAE-Black+SR Ebony Fitted Acoustic/Electric Violin in Metallic Black

★★★★★
$129.99  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 0.01 ounces
Product Dimensions 32 x 12 x 5 inches
ASIN B00GWULQ1O
Item model number 4/4CVNAE-Black+SR
Best Sellers Rank #2,247 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #7 in Acoustic Violins
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available November 25, 2013
Back Material Maple
Color Name Metallic Black
String Material Nickel
Top Material Spruce
Number of Strings 4
Size 23 inches

  • 4/4 (Full Size) Acoustic & Electric Violin
  • Hand-carved solid spruce top, solid maple back & sides with volume and tone control
  • Ebony pegs, chin rest and fingerboard, tailpiece with 4 nickel plated fine tuners
  • Includes: Brazilwood bow with unbleached...

Cecilio CVN-200 Solidwood Violin with D'Addario Prelude Strings, Size 4/4 (Full Size)

★★★★★
$168.84  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 5 pounds
Product Dimensions 32 x 12 x 5 inches
ASIN B00EOYKCFG
Item model number DA_4/4CVN-200+SR+92D+FB1
Batteries 2 AAA batteries required. (included)
Best Sellers Rank #29,524 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #83 in Acoustic Violins
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available August 19, 2013
Back Material Maple
Color Name Nickel
Top Material Spruce
Number of Strings 4
Size 4/4
Battery type Zinc Carbon

  • Size 4/4 (full size) violin with solid spruce wood top, maple back, neck and sides with inlaid purfling in natural varnish
  • Maple fingerboard, boxwood pegs, chinrest, and tailpiece with 4 detachable nickel plated fine tuners
  • Strung with D'Addario Prelude Strings
  • ...

Kennedy Violins Louis Carpini G2 Violin Outfit CLEARANCE Carrying Case and Accessories Included - Solid Maple Wood and Ebony Fittings (4/4)

★★★★★
$586.88  in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 4.15 pounds
Package Dimensions 40 x 12 x 8 inches
ASIN B079SRX74B
Best Sellers Rank #91,304 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #251 in Acoustic Violins
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available February 13, 2018
Back Material Maple
Body Material Maple Wood
Color Name Brown
Fretboard Material Ebony Wood
Top Material Spruce
Neck Material Type Maple Wood
Number of Strings 4
Material Type Spruce Wood, Ebony Wood, Maple Wood
Size 4/4

  • [HIGH-QUALITY CLEARANCE] This instrument is marked down due to a slight cosmetic defect that does not affect playability or sound in any way. Kennedy Violins is proud to offer this beautiful violin in an outfit with bonus accessories. The Carpini G2 is perfect for both students and...

Palatino VN-450-1/2 Allegro Violin Outfit, 1/2 Size

★★★★★
$309.99
$209.97
 in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 3.55 pounds
Product Dimensions 20.75 x 7.25 x 4 inches
ASIN B000BCY5BW
Item model number VN-450-1/2
Best Sellers Rank #177,166 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments) #603 in Acoustic Violins
Date First Available December 14, 2006
Back Material Maple
Body Material Solid Maple
Fretboard Material Ebony
Scale Length 11.25
String Gauge Light
String Material Alloy Steel
Top Material Spruce
Neck Material Type Solid Maple
Number of Strings 4
Guitar Bridge System Maple

  • Solid Hand Carved Spruce Top
  • Solid Hand Carved Maple Back, Sides and Neck
  • Ebony Fittings
  • Inlaid Purfling
  • Ebony Frog Bow and Featherweight Case

Palatino, 4-String Violin (VN-650-3/4)

★★★★★
$309.99
$229.99
 in stock
Amazon.com
as of March 18, 2023 7:02 pm

Features

Item Weight 5 pounds
Product Dimensions 22 x 8 x 2 inches
ASIN B01GV0P5JI
Item model number VN-650-3/4
Is Discontinued By Manufacturer No
Date First Available June 8, 2016
Back Material Ebony, Spruce Wood
Color Name brown
String Material Alloy Steel
Top Material Spruce
Number of Strings 4

  • Solid Hand-Carved Spruce Top
  • Solid Hand-Carved Figured Maple Back
  • Solid Figured Maple Sides
  • Ebony Fingerboard & Pegs
  • Full Suspension Oblong Case & Pernambuco Octagonal Stick Bow with Parisian Eye & Ebony Frog

How To Buy The Best Palatino Violin

The market has been offering various types of best Palatino Violin to suit the needs of each person. When it comes to choosing the best Palatino Violin, there are many criteria that we need to take into consideration.
To help you opt for the most suitable best Palatino Violin, we also highly recommend some of the best Palatino Violin carefully chosen based on several specific criteria in this article.
1. Budget

Price is always one of the most decisive factors when it comes to making a purchase. Your buying power can considerably affect your decision.
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2. Warranty

You should not just consider whether the brand has a good reputation for quality. You also need to check whether its warranty is suitable for you. If your best home surveillance systems can’t be repaired or replaced within the given period, it may not be a good choice.
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When scrolling through the Internet for best home surveillance systems, you may be overwhelmed with hundreds of brands, right? But wait, let me tell you something. We have researched and rounded up a list of the most reliable and trustworthy brands.

We tried and tested a significant number of products from many different brands available on the market. Also, we did check the global ratings and reviews on Amazon about each product before ultimately choosing these brands.
Check out our list and opt for the best Palatino Violin for your house.

The Palatino Violin Tips and Advice

FAQ for Palatino Violin In 2022

Warranty

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The seller is responsible for the warranty of the products you buy. If you encounter any problems with your purchased product, please visit “here.”

Final Though

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JULIAN WANG

JULIAN WANG

I am working 10 years in Technology Field and my passion is review to find best product

17 Comments
  1. This violin arrived as advertised online. The case is not as nice as some I have seen and does not have the backpack straps but does have “legs” on side that enable one to sit the case on the floor without the actual case touching the floor. A single strap is included. Finish is nice and sounds good once tuned. For a student violin, we are very happy with this product. This is after returning several lesser made violins from another website. This exact violin was selling in our local music store for $40 more. Worth buying.

  2. This violin arrived as advertised online. The case is not as nice as some I have seen and does not have the backpack straps but does have “legs” on side that enable one to sit the case on the floor without the actual case touching the floor. A single strap is included. Finish is nice and sounds good once tuned. For a student violin, we are very happy with this product. This is after returning several lesser made violins from another website. This exact violin was selling in our local music store for $40 more. Worth buying.

  3. I purchased this at a local music shop, and managed to get it for a pretty nice price (a little less than the current amazon offer). I didn’t want a bottom of the barrel instrument and initially was looking into used/vintage, but wasn’t finding much in the 3-400 range I was looking to spend. This violin has been reasonably well suited for my initial venture into formal training. I’m just a student and I don’t need a ridiculously expensive instrument, just one that sounds decent and this does the trick.Reasons for only four stars:-It’s still a somewhat mediocre far-east made violin, and you will probably want to replace some things if you really want to get a decent sound out of it. -I personally prefer synthetic strings (I went with Evah Pirazzi ones, but there are cheaper options that are good as well) -Fine tuners (this only has one on the E string, full set is under $10) -A better bow (I went with a carbon fiber CodaBow, which will probably outlast my violin if I stick with this) -Better quality rosin (I wasn’t sold on this making a difference until I started using it)With these changes… I’ve seen a marked difference in the tone, staying in tune, and the overall experience of playing; now it’s really doing quite well and I have no other major complaints.-The pegs are a little slippery, but my instructor suggested for us to use a pencil to help the grip. You just scratch a little graphite on the part of the pegs that are inside the hole and it really does help (no need to spend money on peg drops).-You may also want a different chin rest, and obviously you should get a shoulder rest (but your instructor will likely explain all that, and mine even sold me a chin rest that was perfect for me, I think it was $15. I got a Kun shoulder rest as well, which was around $20).-The case is kind of poorly made and one of the straps fell apart within a few weeks, only having brought it out with me a few times for classes. Luckily I had another similar strap on another case.Otherwise, it’s not a bad choice for a beginner adult/young adult. If you can’t find a better deal on a used instrument, it’s worthwhile, and if you stick with it and plan to continue studying the upgrades will round it all out and you’ll end up with a decent instrument that will last you for quite a while.

  4. I purchased this at a local music shop, and managed to get it for a pretty nice price (a little less than the current amazon offer). I didn’t want a bottom of the barrel instrument and initially was looking into used/vintage, but wasn’t finding much in the 3-400 range I was looking to spend. This violin has been reasonably well suited for my initial venture into formal training. I’m just a student and I don’t need a ridiculously expensive instrument, just one that sounds decent and this does the trick.Reasons for only four stars:-It’s still a somewhat mediocre far-east made violin, and you will probably want to replace some things if you really want to get a decent sound out of it. -I personally prefer synthetic strings (I went with Evah Pirazzi ones, but there are cheaper options that are good as well) -Fine tuners (this only has one on the E string, full set is under $10) -A better bow (I went with a carbon fiber CodaBow, which will probably outlast my violin if I stick with this) -Better quality rosin (I wasn’t sold on this making a difference until I started using it)With these changes… I’ve seen a marked difference in the tone, staying in tune, and the overall experience of playing; now it’s really doing quite well and I have no other major complaints.-The pegs are a little slippery, but my instructor suggested for us to use a pencil to help the grip. You just scratch a little graphite on the part of the pegs that are inside the hole and it really does help (no need to spend money on peg drops).-You may also want a different chin rest, and obviously you should get a shoulder rest (but your instructor will likely explain all that, and mine even sold me a chin rest that was perfect for me, I think it was $15. I got a Kun shoulder rest as well, which was around $20).-The case is kind of poorly made and one of the straps fell apart within a few weeks, only having brought it out with me a few times for classes. Luckily I had another similar strap on another case.Otherwise, it’s not a bad choice for a beginner adult/young adult. If you can’t find a better deal on a used instrument, it’s worthwhile, and if you stick with it and plan to continue studying the upgrades will round it all out and you’ll end up with a decent instrument that will last you for quite a while.

  5. I prefer purchasing a new violin for my daughter when she moves up in size each time but it can get pretty expensive. I am so glad I’ve discovered the Palatino family of violins! With the low price I don’t have to worry about her accidently breaking anything on the instrument because I can afford to get a new one if so. Because it is brand new and not pre-owned I don’t have to worry about something being wrong with it (I don’t know all that much about violins and fixing them). I purchased this particular 3/4 Allegro outfit just before she turned 12 and it works perfectly for her (although I will say – my daughter is very small for her age). She used a 1/4 size from ages 5-7 and the 1/2 size from 8-11. The best part is I can re-sale the used violins for around $80-$100 on craigslist! Her music teacher has always liked the sound and quality of her Palatinos and they look very nice for recitals. I would recommend this violin to any young student playing as a hobby. When my daughter gets serious and needs a full size violin I will probably go with something a little nicer but this brand has worked great for us so far!

  6. Violin appears to be of good quality, but I have never played Violin. My son’s violin teacher at his school has indicated that this a pretty decent violin for a beginner. I was surprised at how nice the violin looks and at the quality of the carrying case.

  7. This product was very nice.

  8. This product was very nice.

  9. I enjoy the violin and it looks nice. The problem is in the set-up. The bridge had to be re-worked by milling it down which requires a professional. Any savings are lost as the pegs slip and the peg holes have to be reamed. Once done it sounds good. Alton

  10. I love the violin so much! It is a beautiful instrument. The case is nice and strong, and the violin sounds amazing. The way the case is put together is awesome! This company has very good customer service and good quality!! Recommended!

  11. I just received this violin yesterday, so I can only give first impressions.I believe I got my money’s worth ($100 on sale at the time of my purchase) as far as a beginning violin outfit is concerned.I have been playing guitar for over thirty years now, and mandolin for a hand full, and as such have purchased a number of guitars (several over the internet) and two mandolins, and know what to expect for the money I’ve spent. $100 will not buy a high quality guitar or mandolin, but it should be serviceable. This then formed the basis of my expectation for this $100 violin outfit. Perhaps not the highest quality, but good enough to get started on.Another thing I considered before making my purchase is the fact that the accessories included have value. My best guess on the value of the accessories included with this violin is $30 to $40, which, when subtracted from the price of the outfit, leaves around $60 or $70 for the violin. I paid $70 for my first mandolin and $85 for my first guitar. They were adequate instruments for grasping the basics of playing, but were both replaced by $500 instruments within a year or so. This is what I expect from my new violin.Now to some specifics. The violin itself arrived in good condition, no visible scratches or imperfections in the finish, the neck is straight with no visible warping, the strings came installed and under loose tension, holding the installed bridge and sound post in place, and there was a cardboard sleeve wrapped around the tail piece to protect the top from damage during shipping. It tuned easily enough using the included tuner (more about which is detailed below), and seems to be holding its tune, running a little flat this morning, but string stretch can account for that. As far as general appearance is concerned, it is a pretty little instrument. For a first violin I am satisfied that I have made a reasonably well informed (having read the reviews listed here on Amazon, including the review left by the luthier, and watched several video demos of this violin) and adequate decision.The bows, both of which were in plastic sleeves, were tightened when they arrived, the sticks of each being straight rather then curved. Understanding that the bow should be relaxed when not in use, I was disappointed by this fact. Both bows resumed some of their curved shape when I released the tension, but I don’t expect either of them to last any real length of time. In a few months, once I have progressed enough to know the violin is a instrument I wish to continue to persue, I’ll be replacing both bows with one of better quality.I can say little about the actual quality of the strings, having no violin specific experience on which to base a first impression, except to say that I will be replacing them soon as a matter of principal. Remembering that two sets of strings are included in the price of the outfit, they can’t be high quality strings.Cheap strings produce cheap tones on my guitars and mandolins. I see no reason why this should be any different for violins. New strings won’t improve the quality of the violin, but they should go some little distance to improving tone and playability.The picture of the case included in the description of the outfit flatters it quite a bit. It’s a cheap case, and I am generally unimpressed with it. It will protect the instrument, which is its purpose, but if I had paid more than $15 or $20 dollars for it separately, I’d be returning it. It just looks cheap to me.I’ve looked over the instruction book and believe it would be a good starting point. I didn’t expect much more than an introductory pamphlet, so receiving a Mel Bay book was a pleasant surprise. I won’t be using it much, however, as I purchased another beginning violin book separately.Finally the tuner. I’ve owned a number of tuners, and this one is what I’d expect to receive for around $10. I’ve compared it with another tuner I own and the tuning app I have downloaded to my phone, and it seems to be within an acceptable margin of error with each. The included metronome is a nice feature of the tuner. I practice both the guitar and mandolin with a metronome and imagine I will do the same with the violin.All together I believe I got what I paid for, a $60 violin with $40 worth of accessories. I expect it to serve me well through the awkward stages of beginning to learn, and to be replaced by a higher quality and more thoroughly researched instrument within a year or so.

  12. My daughter borrowed this exact violin from a family friend while traveling. She normally plays on a violin I own and played in orchestras from grade school through college. I mention that, because – though I’m not a luthier – I do know my way around a violin and can handle most basic adjustments/repairs. This violin was previously played by one student before she moved on to a full size. Here are the issues:-The pegs slip badly when tuning, so much so that the D sting would barely stay in place and would constantly turn flat while playing. That’s a difficult thing for a beginning violinist to deal with, because in order to learn proper finger placement and to play by ear, the strings need to be in tune/stay in tune while playing. Because we had no peg lubricant, we had to attempt soap. This still did not tackle the issue of slippage.-The bridge is awful. It is flat, with almost no arch. So she consistently was playing her D and A strings when attempting to play either string on her own. This is not a beginners issue. I also had the same problem while tuning the instrument. It’s poor bridge quality, not technique.- It’s February in the Midwest with very cold/dry temperatures, so when we got the violin out for a lesson, the strings were all loose and the bridge had fallen. I tried to replace the bridge (something I have done in the past) and it snapped while tightening the strings, despite using care. The sound post looks intact and vertical, but I am not certain because there does seem to be a very slight gap between it and the base of the violin.-So here’s the biggest kicker: I called a local, well established, experienced repair shop that handles all the band/orchestra instruments in their county schools. They flat our refused to look at this violin or fit a new bridge to it for us due to “the cost of repairs exceeding the value of the instrument” and “not being about to take on the liability of repairs due to the risk of breakage due to low quality of the instrument”. So I’m essentially left with possibly having to place a generic bridge back on this instrument, knowing it will likely not stay put because it has not been properly fitted.Overall, the things mentioned above are major issues that affect the ability to play the instrument, and the refusal of repair shops to work on this brand means the violin either becomes disposable once a repair is necessary or you’re repairing it in such a basic way as to continue it’s low quality playing and lack of durability or life frame.-Pros: While I cannot speak to quality, I actually like the chin rest and shoulder rest, finding them comfortable and helpful in her positioning. The case is a decent & pretty case for a first violin, with ample roominess, place holders for bows, and decent zipper, handles and straps. We did not test it our for protecting the instrument from a fall or from weight bearing, but it is not a hard case. The bow is ok. Not great by any means. but for a first time violin, you don’t expect the best quality.

  13. My daughter borrowed this exact violin from a family friend while traveling. She normally plays on a violin I own and played in orchestras from grade school through college. I mention that, because – though I’m not a luthier – I do know my way around a violin and can handle most basic adjustments/repairs. This violin was previously played by one student before she moved on to a full size. Here are the issues:-The pegs slip badly when tuning, so much so that the D sting would barely stay in place and would constantly turn flat while playing. That’s a difficult thing for a beginning violinist to deal with, because in order to learn proper finger placement and to play by ear, the strings need to be in tune/stay in tune while playing. Because we had no peg lubricant, we had to attempt soap. This still did not tackle the issue of slippage.-The bridge is awful. It is flat, with almost no arch. So she consistently was playing her D and A strings when attempting to play either string on her own. This is not a beginners issue. I also had the same problem while tuning the instrument. It’s poor bridge quality, not technique.- It’s February in the Midwest with very cold/dry temperatures, so when we got the violin out for a lesson, the strings were all loose and the bridge had fallen. I tried to replace the bridge (something I have done in the past) and it snapped while tightening the strings, despite using care. The sound post looks intact and vertical, but I am not certain because there does seem to be a very slight gap between it and the base of the violin.-So here’s the biggest kicker: I called a local, well established, experienced repair shop that handles all the band/orchestra instruments in their county schools. They flat our refused to look at this violin or fit a new bridge to it for us due to “the cost of repairs exceeding the value of the instrument” and “not being about to take on the liability of repairs due to the risk of breakage due to low quality of the instrument”. So I’m essentially left with possibly having to place a generic bridge back on this instrument, knowing it will likely not stay put because it has not been properly fitted.Overall, the things mentioned above are major issues that affect the ability to play the instrument, and the refusal of repair shops to work on this brand means the violin either becomes disposable once a repair is necessary or you’re repairing it in such a basic way as to continue it’s low quality playing and lack of durability or life frame.-Pros: While I cannot speak to quality, I actually like the chin rest and shoulder rest, finding them comfortable and helpful in her positioning. The case is a decent & pretty case for a first violin, with ample roominess, place holders for bows, and decent zipper, handles and straps. We did not test it our for protecting the instrument from a fall or from weight bearing, but it is not a hard case. The bow is ok. Not great by any means. but for a first time violin, you don’t expect the best quality.

  14. I have had this violin for over a year now and it has served me very well. This is the first and only violin I’ve ever bought since I’m a beginner and live in a small town where there aren’t too many instrument shops. And although I am a beginner, I would consider myself experienced in terms of working with stringed instruments, since I’m an orchestrator and have to know what the violin sounds like (and all its intricacies) to effectively write for it. Plus, with more than a year’s hands-on experience with the violin, I should be able to provide some insightful comments and observations. Now, with that being said, here is my detailed review (with a tl;dr):The book that comes with the purchase is not bad, but if you have a teacher they will probably recommend something else, although I’ve heard other commentators say their teachers loved it. Personally, it doesn’t cut it for me, but I will admit the exercises are quite good. The book is lackluster when explaining how to properly hold the violin and bow, but once again, a teacher will help you with that. There are also many good tutorials on YouTube about the basics of violin playing, which I’ve learned from since I’m self-taught. The violin itself is of pretty decent quality. Obviously at this price you’re simply not going to receive a high-standard/amazing violin, but it definitely gets the job done. The back of the neck perfectly blends the varnish with the naked wood, which is more aesthetic than practical, but it performs the same purpose as does an abrupt transition from wood to varnish/varnish to wood. This is extremely important for left-hand mobility, and this violin doesn’t have a problem with that. The case is pretty good as well, but it’s nothing remarkable; it performs its intended purpose of facilitating transportation and storage. I do need to mention, though, that when I ordered this violin for the first time, it came with a visibly large crack starting at the left “f” hole — which didn’t necessarily render the instrument unplayable but was… unsavory, to put it mildly. When I told the seller about the problem they promptly sent out another violin and the instrument came without any issues… except one of the bows was broken. It’s a good thing they give you two bows because I wouldn’t have enough patience to send the order back once more. Speaking of the bows, they are (or used to be) described as “brazilwood”. These bows are okay to use, but I would strongly recommend buying a good wooden or carbon fiber bow instead; it will make your life much easier. The bows provided are subpar in terms of quality, and as for them being brazilwood? It’s like trying to sell a #2 pencil as a fountain pen. The bows won’t last you for too long; the same goes for the rosin and the shoulder rest. The rosin isn’t bad, per se, but it isn’t great. Sometimes good rosin can be the solution to sounding better than a dying dolphin. However, the shoulder rest is a complete joke and it’s barely permissible even when acknowledging the price. I could easily go off for hours on just how much pain and discomfort that bloody excuse for a piece of equipment caused me in the beginning. I would advise purchasing either a Kun or a Fiddlerman shoulder rest if you decide you need one. They are well worth the money and they allow you to hold the violin properly and with considerably less strain than the ludicrous one provided. Some buyers have had problems with the chin rest, and that’s expected because this violin comes with a very standard chin rest that won’t suit everyone’s needs. It works fine for me, but it may not for you. The tuner is fine, although a piano or keyboard will also work just as well, or even free apps you can get on your phone. I’ve heard some people complaining about how the pegs at the top (pegbox) won’t stay put or the strings won’t stay in tune; all you need to do is make sure to push the pegs in a bit when you’re tuning the strings and everything should be fine. I haven’t had much trouble with the fine tuners at the bottom, either. It’s nice that the seller gives you an extra (unsanded) bridge in case the one you have breaks, but at the time of my purchase, the one installed on the violin isn’t set up quite right (I guess the seller decided to now ship it without the bridge installed to avoid damage, which is understandable). Of course, it ultimately comes down to preference with this sort of thing, since some people like the G string side to be lower or higher and stuff like that, but there is an objectively correct way to position it as well. For example, I’ve noticed that when I play sul D (only on the D string), there comes a point where it becomes virtually impossible to avoid hitting another string. I’m not saying this out of inexperience or obliviousness, either, because I physically cannot play sul D much over an octave without the problem becoming more pronounced. If I had to guess, in violin terms this would be about at 5th or 6th position. This phenomenon isn’t an obstacle on the A string, so I know it’s a D string problem. You might find it preferable to sand down the bridge a bit on the G string side, but just make sure you handle it with care and don’t disturb the soundpost. If you do manage to disturb the soundpost, you need to take it to a luthier so they can put it back in place (the sound will be incredibly dull and unresonant without it). As for the D’Addario Prelude strings themselves, they are of fair quality and have a bright and full sound. I’m not really a fan of the G or A strings, but they still sound more than okay to play on. They have lasted me for over a year, so they shouldn’t break easily, although I wouldn’t say I’m a strenuous player by any stretch of the imagination. When you’re able to play fairly well I would say to get new strings like Dominants or Pirastros since they can often prove a little finicky, but the D’Addario ones will work quite adequately for beginners and probably even intermediate players. A rubber mute would also be a great addition, and you can buy one for less than 5 USD for the benefit of not annoying the neighbors. One thing to mention is that this is certainly NOT an advanced or professional player’s violin. It should work well for beginners and intermediates only. Other than all that, it’s a nice violin. You need to install the bridge and perform some excess maintenance, but overall, it is well set up and competently made. The fingerboard is a nice ebony, which is good considering some beginner violins use some kind of satanic black paint that stains your fingers and makes you appear like a victim of the Bubonic Plague. You might get slightly blackened fingers on this violin, but that’s due to natural oils from your skin reacting with the strings/fingerboard. It’s nothing to worry about, and the occurrence will disappear after you play the instrument for some time. I would buy this exact same violin if I were to start all over.Tl;dr: Good violin for beginners, but I would do away with the bow, “shoulder rest” (if you can call it that), and possibly strings if you’re more intermediate. Should last you a while if you treat it with care.

  15. I have had this violin for over a year now and it has served me very well. This is the first and only violin I’ve ever bought since I’m a beginner and live in a small town where there aren’t too many instrument shops. And although I am a beginner, I would consider myself experienced in terms of working with stringed instruments, since I’m an orchestrator and have to know what the violin sounds like (and all its intricacies) to effectively write for it. Plus, with more than a year’s hands-on experience with the violin, I should be able to provide some insightful comments and observations. Now, with that being said, here is my detailed review (with a tl;dr):The book that comes with the purchase is not bad, but if you have a teacher they will probably recommend something else, although I’ve heard other commentators say their teachers loved it. Personally, it doesn’t cut it for me, but I will admit the exercises are quite good. The book is lackluster when explaining how to properly hold the violin and bow, but once again, a teacher will help you with that. There are also many good tutorials on YouTube about the basics of violin playing, which I’ve learned from since I’m self-taught. The violin itself is of pretty decent quality. Obviously at this price you’re simply not going to receive a high-standard/amazing violin, but it definitely gets the job done. The back of the neck perfectly blends the varnish with the naked wood, which is more aesthetic than practical, but it performs the same purpose as does an abrupt transition from wood to varnish/varnish to wood. This is extremely important for left-hand mobility, and this violin doesn’t have a problem with that. The case is pretty good as well, but it’s nothing remarkable; it performs its intended purpose of facilitating transportation and storage. I do need to mention, though, that when I ordered this violin for the first time, it came with a visibly large crack starting at the left “f” hole — which didn’t necessarily render the instrument unplayable but was… unsavory, to put it mildly. When I told the seller about the problem they promptly sent out another violin and the instrument came without any issues… except one of the bows was broken. It’s a good thing they give you two bows because I wouldn’t have enough patience to send the order back once more. Speaking of the bows, they are (or used to be) described as “brazilwood”. These bows are okay to use, but I would strongly recommend buying a good wooden or carbon fiber bow instead; it will make your life much easier. The bows provided are subpar in terms of quality, and as for them being brazilwood? It’s like trying to sell a #2 pencil as a fountain pen. The bows won’t last you for too long; the same goes for the rosin and the shoulder rest. The rosin isn’t bad, per se, but it isn’t great. Sometimes good rosin can be the solution to sounding better than a dying dolphin. However, the shoulder rest is a complete joke and it’s barely permissible even when acknowledging the price. I could easily go off for hours on just how much pain and discomfort that bloody excuse for a piece of equipment caused me in the beginning. I would advise purchasing either a Kun or a Fiddlerman shoulder rest if you decide you need one. They are well worth the money and they allow you to hold the violin properly and with considerably less strain than the ludicrous one provided. Some buyers have had problems with the chin rest, and that’s expected because this violin comes with a very standard chin rest that won’t suit everyone’s needs. It works fine for me, but it may not for you. The tuner is fine, although a piano or keyboard will also work just as well, or even free apps you can get on your phone. I’ve heard some people complaining about how the pegs at the top (pegbox) won’t stay put or the strings won’t stay in tune; all you need to do is make sure to push the pegs in a bit when you’re tuning the strings and everything should be fine. I haven’t had much trouble with the fine tuners at the bottom, either. It’s nice that the seller gives you an extra (unsanded) bridge in case the one you have breaks, but at the time of my purchase, the one installed on the violin isn’t set up quite right (I guess the seller decided to now ship it without the bridge installed to avoid damage, which is understandable). Of course, it ultimately comes down to preference with this sort of thing, since some people like the G string side to be lower or higher and stuff like that, but there is an objectively correct way to position it as well. For example, I’ve noticed that when I play sul D (only on the D string), there comes a point where it becomes virtually impossible to avoid hitting another string. I’m not saying this out of inexperience or obliviousness, either, because I physically cannot play sul D much over an octave without the problem becoming more pronounced. If I had to guess, in violin terms this would be about at 5th or 6th position. This phenomenon isn’t an obstacle on the A string, so I know it’s a D string problem. You might find it preferable to sand down the bridge a bit on the G string side, but just make sure you handle it with care and don’t disturb the soundpost. If you do manage to disturb the soundpost, you need to take it to a luthier so they can put it back in place (the sound will be incredibly dull and unresonant without it). As for the D’Addario Prelude strings themselves, they are of fair quality and have a bright and full sound. I’m not really a fan of the G or A strings, but they still sound more than okay to play on. They have lasted me for over a year, so they shouldn’t break easily, although I wouldn’t say I’m a strenuous player by any stretch of the imagination. When you’re able to play fairly well I would say to get new strings like Dominants or Pirastros since they can often prove a little finicky, but the D’Addario ones will work quite adequately for beginners and probably even intermediate players. A rubber mute would also be a great addition, and you can buy one for less than 5 USD for the benefit of not annoying the neighbors. One thing to mention is that this is certainly NOT an advanced or professional player’s violin. It should work well for beginners and intermediates only. Other than all that, it’s a nice violin. You need to install the bridge and perform some excess maintenance, but overall, it is well set up and competently made. The fingerboard is a nice ebony, which is good considering some beginner violins use some kind of satanic black paint that stains your fingers and makes you appear like a victim of the Bubonic Plague. You might get slightly blackened fingers on this violin, but that’s due to natural oils from your skin reacting with the strings/fingerboard. It’s nothing to worry about, and the occurrence will disappear after you play the instrument for some time. I would buy this exact same violin if I were to start all over.Tl;dr: Good violin for beginners, but I would do away with the bow, “shoulder rest” (if you can call it that), and possibly strings if you’re more intermediate. Should last you a while if you treat it with care.

  16. If you’re a beginner looking for an acoustic/electric violin with an antique varnish finish, this particular model might be a good option for you.The violin is well-made and feels sturdy in your hands. The antique varnish finish gives it a nice vintage look, which is a nice touch. The sound is good and the instrument holds its tune well.One of the biggest selling points of this violin is the fact that it is an acoustic/electric hybrid. This means that you can plug it in and amplify the sound, which is great for live performances or recording sessions. The electronics work well and produce a clean sound with minimal feedback.However, there are a few downsides to this violin. One is that the included bow is not of the best quality, so you might want to consider purchasing a separate bow if you plan on playing frequently. Another is that the overall sound of the instrument is not as rich and full as you might expect from a higher-end violin.In summary, this is an okay beginner’s acoustic/electric violin with an antique varnish finish. It has some nice features and a good sound, but there are some downsides to keep in mind. Overall, it’s a decent option for a beginner who is just starting out and looking for an affordable instrument.

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